FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

What is required before the appointment?

To gain the most benefit out of your travel consultation, please bring your itinerary, including all countries you plan to visit, duration of stay, planned activities, immunization records if available.

How far in advance to come in?

Most vaccines take time to become effective and some vaccines must be given in a series over a period of days or sometimes weeks, Please make a travel appointment as soon as you know your itinerary so we can discuss your needs.

How long to get an appointment?

Our travel clinics offers same day and next day appointments. We are open six days a week including Saturdays.

Will medical insurance cover travel visit and vaccinations?

Unlike other travel clinic we take direct billing from medical insurance and it will save your time. Don’t pay for vaccines out of pocket. If you have insurance, we may be able to submit your claim directly and save you the hassle of sending in your receipts. Most travel clinics take money from your pocket and give you the bill.

What vaccines needed for travel?

Recommendations regarding pre – travel immunizations and medications will be made based on your personal travel plans including your destinations, planned activities, length of stay and health history.

What is Polio?

What it is:
Polio is a viral infection that affects the nervous system causing poliomyelitis. The symptoms are paralysis, affecting the legs or the facial nerves.

How you get it:
Polio infection is easily spread through contaminated food or water or by respiratory contact.

Where is it common:
While Polio is considered to be eliminated here in the US, polio still exists in many developing countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe.

Who should get Polio vaccine:
Anyone who has not been previously immunized or has not been fully immunized according to the US immunization schedule. Also travelers to areas where poliomyelitis is widespread who received their last dose of polio vaccine more than 10 years ago.

What to expect after vaccination:
Adverse reactions to Polio immunization are usually mild and confined to the first few days after immunization. The most common reactions are mild, transient soreness, and redness at the injection site. Severe reactions (such as lips swelling, tongue swelling, difficulty breathing, etc) following vaccination are very rare.

What is Hepatitis B?

What it is:
Hepatitis B is also an infection of the liver, caused by a virus. However, Hepatitis B is a much more serious and deadly disease than Hepatitis A. Hepatitis B causes a very serious liver infection that leads to permanent liver damage, liver cancer and death.

How you get it:
Hepatitis B infection is spread by use of contaminated needles, razors, dental and medical equipment, tattooing and body piercing devices, unprotected sexual contact with infected individuals and from contaminated blood and blood products.

How to protect yourself:
If you have not been vaccinated against Hepatitis B, the 3-dose vaccination series is recommended for travelers to certain countries for an extended stay, or if you plan certain activities. If your departure will not allow the routine 6 month vaccination schedule, an accelerated schedule can be used to provide sufficient protection.

Where is it common:
Hepatitis B is common in South-East Asia, the Middle and Far East, Southern Europe and Africa.

Who should get Hepatitis B vaccine:
Travelers to areas of widespread presence of the disease who place themselves at risk when abroad. Behaviors that place them at risk include unsafe sexual activity, injecting drug use, or participating in contact sports. Also travelers who plan to stay in areas of high prevalence for long time. Also individuals who are travelling to visit friends or relatives with chronic hepatitis B infection and families adopting children from countries with a high prevalence of hepatitis B.

What to expect after vaccination:
Adverse reactions to hepatitis B immunization are usually mild and confined to the first few days after immunization. The most common reactions are mild, transient soreness, and redness at the injection site. Severe reactions (such as lips swelling, tongue swelling, difficulty breathing, etc) following vaccination are very rare.

What vaccines do we provide?

We carry a full scope of travel vaccines including Yellow Fever. We also provide International Certificate of Yellow Fever Vaccination and necessary prescriptions against infectious diseases such as malaria.

what is yellow fever?

What it is:

Yellow fever is a viral disease caused by the bite of one species of mosquito. Yellow fever typically occurs in sub – Saharan Africa and tropical South America where epidemic can occur. Symptoms of illness range from “flu-like” symptoms to severe fevers with the discharge of blood. Yellow fever can be fatal.

How you get it:

Certain areas of the world are considered yellow fever endemic areas because yellow fever is so widespread that there is a very high risk of travelers coming in contact with infected mosquitoes. In these areas, the highest risk of infection occurs during the rainy and early dry seasons.

How to protect yourself:

Protection from yellow fever is two-fold: (1) getting the yellow fever vaccine before you travel and (2) carefully following the personal protective measures against insect bites while you’re traveling. The need for the vaccine will be based on your itinerary. Vaccination will be RECOMMENDED for some areas of travel and REQUIRED for others. For entry into some countries, yellow fever vaccination is a REQUIREMENT.

Where is it common:

Yellow Fever is common in West and Central Africa and in parts of Central and South America.

Who should get Yellow Fever vaccine:

Anyone who is traveling to areas with known Yellow Fever (West and Central Africa and in parts of Central and South America).

What to expect after vaccination:

Adverse reactions following yellow fever vaccine are typically very mild and consist of a headache, muscle ache, low-grade fever, and/or soreness at the injection site. Injection site reactions usually occur in 1-5 days after immunization. Severe allergic reactions (such as shortness of breath, lip or tongue swelling, difficulty breathing, encephalitis, etc) are rare.

Source:http://www.travelclinicnyc.com/yellow-fever/

What is Hepatitis A?

What it is:
Hepatitis A is an infection of the liver caused by a virus. The symptoms are a sudden fever, discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea and dark urine. While the illness is usually mild, it can be severe. Symptoms last about 2 weeks, but complete recovery takes 8 weeks.

How you get it:
Hepatitis A infection is spread through contaminated food or water and by person to person contact with an infected person. Travelers in countries with poor or less developed sanitation systems are at the greatest risk for infection.

How to protect yourself:
Getting the Hepatitis A vaccine is a good start. In addition, when you are traveling, it’s always good to be “Food-wise and Water-smart” and ALWAYS practice good personal hygiene (hand washing especially).

Where is it common:
Hepatitis A is common in Indian subcontinent, the Far East, South America and Eastern Europe.

Who should get Yellow Fever vaccine:
Anyone who is travelling to areas of high risk (Indian subcontinent, the Far East, South Amarica and Eastern Europe). Also people with chronic liver disease, as they are especially at risk.

What to expect after vaccination:
Adverse reactions to hepatitis A immunization are usually mild and confined to the first few days after immunization. The most common reactions are mild, transient soreness, and redness at the injection site. Severe reactions (such as lips swelling, tongue swelling, difficulty breathing, etc) following vaccination are very rare.

What is Typhoid?

What it is:

Typhoid fever is an infection caused by a bacteria that invades the digestive tract. The key symptom of typhoid fever is a prolonged high fever, but also it is often accompanied by a headache, discomfort, cough and loss of appetite. Diarrhea, from mild to severe, may or may not occur. Treatment for typhoid fever may require antibiotics, and even hospitalization in severe cases.

How you get it:
Like Hepatitis A, travelers get typhoid fever from contaminated food or water due to poor sanitation or person-to-person contact with an infected person. Typhoid fever is present worldwide. As a result, typhoid fever can be a risk for many travelers.

How to protect yourself:
Again, getting the typhoid fever vaccine is a good start. But it’s still important to be “Food-wise and Water-smart”.

Where is it common:
Typhoid fever is common in South Asia, parts of south East Asia, the Middle East, Central and South America, and Africa.

Who should get Hepatitis B vaccine:
Travelers to countries where typhoid is widespread (e.g. south Asia, parts of south East Asia, the Middle East, Central and South America, and Africa), especially if staying with or visiting the local population.

What to expect after vaccination:
Adverse reactions to Typhoid immunization are usually mild and confined to the first few days after immunization. The most common reactions are mild, transient soreness, and redness at the injection site if given as an injection or mild gastrointestinal effects if taken by mouth. Severe reactions (such as lips swelling, tongue swelling, difficulty breathing, etc) following vaccination are very rare.

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